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More vetting needed, but not where you think




The recent report of rampant sexual assaults occurring at an upstate New York nursing home proves, once again, that more vetting is needed of parolees being considered for nursing home admission.

Just to be clear, Families for Better Care is not supportive of parolees being discharged from prison into nursing homes–or any other long-term care setting–with vulnerable elderly or disabled adults.  PERIOD.


“Why would any nursing home administrator even welcome the thought of admitting former inmates to live with our grandparents in the first place?”


But since judges are going to be judges and do what they do, an overarching question must be asked and answered before any parolee placement occurs.  That is, why would any nursing home administrator even welcome the thought of admitting former inmates to live with our grandparents in the first place?

(Undoubtedly, one would think, that the administrator’s decision has something to do with bed counts and high profit margins to keep their bosses happy.)

But would these same administrators, and for that matter the judges or nursing home owners themselves, be hospitable enough to open their front doors and welcome potentially dangerous individuals to live with their families–or to live and play with their children–even if they were to be “supervised every 15 minutes?”

Probably not.

So, it should not be okay for these gatekeepers to bless the placement of parolees into nursing homes.

But when they do, and they will, then the toughest, most stringent vetting must happen.  And that vetting should include, in addition to a protocol that evaluates whether the facility can sufficiently provide for the prospective residents’ health care needs, a comprehensive understanding of a parolee’s criminal history to ascertain the potentiality of any violent behavior that may occur toward residents or staff.  That way, administrators will be able to discern whether an admission is safely warranted or not.


“No excuse for lamenting inadequate admission policies that permitted a bad hombre to slip through the vetting process.”


There is no excuse for lamenting inadequate admission policies that permitted a bad hombre to slip through the vetting process, who then went on to commit horrific acts against other residents.  Nursing home personnel failing to employ tough vetting measures for paroled inmates is ridiculously irresponsible and they should be held accountable when residents suffer unnecessary harm because of their reckless negligence.